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60 Types of Drills

by Jenny Mae Talaver August 21, 2020

60 Types of Drills

Drilling is one of the most basic integral tasks for workers in various different fields. Making holes into materials are part of work prep or operations in several different occupations. This fact makes drills one of the most vital tools to get in your workshop or toolset. But before you get one, remember that there are many different types of drills.

A drill is a tool, either manual or electric powered, that bores holes or fastens materials together. It is used in woodworking, metalworking, machine tool fabrication, construction, DIY projects. and even in medicine, space missions and miniature applications.

If you want to use a drill for your work, you need to get the right drill first. Each drill does its own drilling styles, works on specific materials and is applicable on certain fields. Getting the right drill for your tasks and mastering its use is integral to the regular efficiency of your work.

Feeling overwhelmed by the sheer volume of choice when it comes to drilling tools? Worry no more!

The Rock Hard Toolz team has prepared a comprehensive guide on drills for every worker. In this guide, you will learn about the 60 types of drills, their uses, pros and cons.

Types of Drills

There are drills that cater to many different types of materials and occupations. Some are small, others big. Some are manual, many are powered by electricity.

To help you get started with working with drills, here are the different types of drills that are in use all over the world, in many different workplaces:

Manual Drills

Hand drill/eggbeater drill:

The hand drill is a manual, gear-driven tool. It works with a driving wheel that spins when you use the turning handle.

The drill moves with the chuck, and the drill bit rotates at the same time.

This is popular with handymen and woodworkers.

Uses:

  • drilling small holes
  • works on softwood and soft metals.

Pros:

  • more control on drilling
  • durable
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Works less noisily
  • Can be used anywhere, anytime

Cons:

  • Takes more time to drill
  • Can cause fatigue with long use

Brace drill:

Brace drills are designed with spindles or wrenches. This design makes driving long screws into hard materials less stressful than with a hand drill.

A brace drill has 2 U-shaped spindles. One is cranked for more torque. And the other spindle on the top is designed for a strong grip while drilling. Having a stronger separation from the focal point of revolution makes it more useful than the turning handle of a hand drill.

To make precise holes with a brace drill, hold one spindle with one hand and use another hand to rotate the second spindle in the clockwise direction.

You can use screwdriver bits with this drill for even more torque.

Uses:

  • countersinking in the wood.
  • Piercing hard materials such as hardwood
  • drills vast distance across gaps.

Pros:

  • works with more torque
  • great for drilling bigger width gaps
  • great to drive long screws into hard material

Cons:

  • drills slowly
  • Not for drilling materials which requires a high cutting pace such as metals

Push drill:

A push drill is a lightweight tool, slender in design. It works with a spiral ratchet that rotates the bit.

Uses:

Woodworking

Pros:

  • Lightweight and compact
  • More powerful than many drilling machines

Breast drill:

Breast drills are designed with 15 inches long body and a concave plate. This plate serves as support for you to lean on while drilling.

This is great when you drill while standing.

You can find them as chest drills, belly drills, or knee drills.

Uses:

  • boring holes in iron and steel.
  • A necessary tool in the construction industry, factories, blacksmith shops, and rail car fabricated shops.

Pros:

  • Great for working with larger wood bits and any size metal bit
  • comes with a supportive plate that helps you drill while standing

Cons:

  • low torque
  • not for precision work

Table drill:

A table drill machine is a general-purpose drilling machine. This manual drill has a lever for drilling. Plus, for more comfort while working, this drill also has a table accompanying it.

Uses:

  • You can use a table drill to drill holes that are 10 mm in diameter.
  • For light duty tasks

Pros:

  • easy to use
  • geared for comfort

Cons:

  • low-powered
  • not for heavy-duty tasks

Antique drill:

Mainly made of hardwood, antique drills are varied in shape and use. They include T-shaped augers, spoon augers, spiral-bit augers, and Archimedean drills.

Uses:

  • Works in many fields from furniture making, woodworking and traditional medicine

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • Durable
  • versatile

Cons:

  • works slowly
  • Can cause fatigue

Bow drill:

Also known as a fire drill, a bow drill is designed with a bearing block, a spindle, a hearth, and a bow. It is mainly used to create fires.  This is an ancient drill which can be traced back to our Neolithic ancestors. In fact, bow drills have been found in archaeological digs of ancient tombs around the world from Europe to Africa.

Mainly used to create fire, bow-drills were also used in ancient woodwork, stonework, and dentistry.

It creates fires through friction. Aside from making fires, it also drills holes for many materials in woodworking, stonework and dentistry.

Uses:

  • Makes fire without matches
  • Bores through materials
  • also works on woodworking and dentistry.

Pros:

  • drills quicker and more efficiently
  • Easy to DIY
  • Great for camping and survivalists

Cons:

  • requires a lot of practice to master
  • Can cause fatigue
  • Needs dry materials for it to work

Auger

Another ancient hand drill is the auger. Starting from Roman times, the auger has been used to drill larger holes. This is a hand crank drill with two parts – a brace and a drill bit. You hold this drill with the brace and the rotating helical screw bit rotates and does the drilling.

Uses:

  • tapping springs and creating post holes.
  • Also works on clearing ice, fishing

Pros:

  • Cheap
  • Requires less maintenance
  • Provides more torque for larger holes
  • Lightweight
  • Can be dissembled for easy storage

Cons:

  • drills slowly
  • Causes fatigue
  • Not so great on tough soil

Ground Auger (Earth Auger)

This is a specialized type of hand drill. A ground auger drills precisely that – ground or soils. It is a stronger version of the auger.

This is a gas-powered hand drill with an aggressive, wide bit that tears through the ground.

Uses:

  • Drills holes into the ground or ice.
  • for setting posts of all types and ice fishing.

Pros:

  • Drills easily
  • Works on all soil and ground conditions
  • Removes dirt faster than a shovel

Cons:

  • Risky for people with heart conditions
  • Can cause wrist injuries
  • Operating this tool can create sparks of fires around dry vegetation

Gimlet:

A gimlet is the larger version of the auger. This corkscrew-like tool is a long drill bit with two handles for rotating it. It works on leverage.

You can also use it as an auger and reamers.

Uses:

  • Drilling broad and deep holes in the wood without splitting
  • bores water pipes.

Pros:

  • handy
  • Drills deeply

Cons:

  • requires significant experience to run

Crank drill:

A crank drill is a twist drill. This creates deep holes into hard materials. It is designed with a high helix angle for high penetration efficiency, and a sharpened tip for efficient cutting ability.

Uses:

  • drill into hard materials like steel and metal alloys.
  • Curve surface drilling

Pros:

  • won’t slip
  • drills accurately

Cons:

  • Generates less torque
  • Not also suited to drilling expansive breadth gaps

Pump Drill

This hand drill comes from Roman artisans. It is designed with a vertical spindle aligned by a piece of horizontal wood and a flywheel to maintain accuracy and momentum.

This is a simple, lightweight tool for making holes in light materials.

It works similarly to a bow drill but it is not used to make fires.

Uses:

  • Drills holes in light and soft materials

Pros:

  • Easy to DIY
  • Works in many different trades
  • drills accurately

Cons:

  • takes some practice to master
  • Not for large, industrial projects

Miniature Hand Drill

The miniature hand drill is specialized in crafting. Especially for fine work such as model making. You use this to drill holes with very small, high-speed steel bits.

Uses:

  • Making pilot holes for small screws
  • For fine work

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • Lightweight
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Generates less torque
  • Mostly used for crafting only

Joist Brace

It is designed similarly to a brace drill. It consists of a chuck and ratchet. It drills well due to its frame that uses a lever at right angles to the line of the drill bit.

With a similar chuck and ratchet construction to the standard brace, the joist brace is especially useful for drilling in restricted spaces due to a

Uses:

  • drilling in restricted or tight spaces

Pros:

  • ergonomic design
  • Drills well
  • Can fit in places that other drills cannot do

Cons:

  • limited in use

Post Drill

These hand-powered drills get their name from their mount. They’re usually mounted onto posts.

You can find them used in farms and industries. Mostly to cut through iron and metals. But its efficiency is limited by the worker’s own strength.

Uses:

  • Cuts down metals and other dense materials
  • Mostly used in farms and industries

Pros:

  • drills deeply
  • easy to use

Cons:

  • limited by worker’s strength and stamina

Archimedes Drill

The Archimedes drill is a small drill, decision for precision. This can hold small drill bits up to 1 millimeters and drill holes efficiently. It has a spiral push design.

To drill with this tool, simply push down on the top with your fore finger while working the central spiral up and down with your thumb and middle finger.

Uses:

  • Creates delicate, precise holes

Pros:

  • Can hold all small drill bits up to 1.0mm
  • Best for precision drilling

Cons

  • Drills slowly
  • Can break smaller (<0.9 mm) drill bits

Pin chuck:

A pin chuck is a small drill. It works with bits between 0 to 2.5 mm, small diameter drill bits. It is designed with two parts: head and collet jaws. You can find 3-4 jaws in a pin chuck.

You can insert different sizes of collets inserted in a pin chuck, with varying diameters. It is mostly used to hold drill bits that are too small for a regular drill chuck to hold.

Uses:

  • drill small holes.
  • Usually used by watch repair and jewelry workers

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • great for fine details

Cons:

  • limited to outside and bottom shaping
  • Issues with pin holes

Power Drills

Corded drill:

Corded drills are drills that are powered by electricity. To work with this, you need to plug into a strong power supply. You also need it to have a long enough cord for you to work flexibly.

These drills are high-performing, with greater torque than manual drills. It usually comes with an amperage of 3-10.

Uses:

  • drilling into wood, fiberglass, and metal, plastic.
  • fix anything and remove screws, sanding and polishing wood using the tool.

Pros:

  • versatile
  • High-powered
  • Ergonomic design

Cons:

  • Needs to be plugged into a continuous power supply

Battery drills/cordless drill:

It works similarly to corded drills. But it differs in power source and weight. It runs on batteries and it is lighter than corded models.

The voltage capacity is between 6-24 volts; the voltage determines its weight. Besides that, you can carry this tool with you and can operate it without power supply. But you need to recharge it before or in-between the task.

Uses:

  • Drills into wood, metal sheets, fiberglass, and plastic.

Pros:

  • lightweight and compact
  • portable and easy to manuever

Cons:

  • needs regular charging
  • Not for massive drilling works such as on concrete or masonry

Hammer drill:

This power drill is a heavy hitter among drills. It works with a hammer-like action that provides a direct force on the drill bit to make drilling hard materials effortless.

You can find a hammer drill in both cordless and corded models.

Uses:

  • Standard drilling tasks
  • Can drill into hard materials such as concrete and bricks

Pros:

  • Universal drilling tool
  • Best for masonry and heavy-duty drilling
  • adjustable clutch

Cons:

  • bulky
  • noisy

Rotary Hammer

A bigger version of the hammer drill is the rotary hammer. It works with a hammer and chipping mechanism to produce more power into the drilling operations.

It can drill into a wide variety of materials from wood to masonry.

Uses:

  • drill holes or break up wood, concrete, asphalt, stone, brick, or other masonry up to 2″ or so.

Pros:

  • packs a lot of power
  • Less vibrations
  • Heavy-duty

Cons:

  • bulky and heavy
  • Mostly uses only SDS bits

SDS drill:

An SDS drill is a rotary hammer works with two mechanism: hammer mechanism and rotation mechanism.

It comes with two handles; one stationary handle at the back, and an extra front handle that is adjustable in any direction. With this, you get stable operations and less risk of misalignment. It is also very safe to use.

Uses:

  • Drills into hard materials such as concrete or masonry.

Pros:

  • high drilling rate and chiselling performance
  • overload clutch to protect the machine and the user
  • versatile functions
  • compact
  • comes with LED light

Cons

  • Not compatible with normal drill bits
  • Pricey

Combi drill:

Combi drill is a multipurpose drill. It is a much upgraded version of a hammer drill, with both impact and rotation mechanisms.

It is best for jobs that require high torque.

Uses:

  • Drive screws in concrete and masonry
  • Drills holes into both hard and soft materials

Pros:

  • dual speed
  • multipurpose

Cons:

  • pricey

Reversible drill

A reversible drill works with a clockwise to counter-clockwise mechanism. This is advantageous when you drive or push in screws.

This is a nifty multifunction tool. This power drill comes in both corded and cordless models.

Uses:

  • Drilling holes
  • Drive and remove screws

Pros:

  • Multipurpose
  • Packs a lot of power and torque
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Might not do as well as specialized drills

Impact drill

An impact driver combines rotational and concussive power into a high-performance drilling machine.

They are great for heavy-duty tasks in construction, renovation and other related industries.

This lightweight drill packs a lot of power in its compact form. You can adjust different types and sizes of the bit to its chuck.

Uses:

  • Drills into both hard and soft materials
  • Can perform construction works such as building fences and decks

Pros:

  • lightweight and compact
  • drills with more cutting power and torque
  • for heavy-duty work
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • only works with hex-shanked drill bits and drivers
  • not for precision drilling
  • noisy
  • more expensive than other drills

Impact wrench:

Impact wrenches are versatile drilling tools. These power tools offer high torque and long work performance.

They drill well, powered by either compressed air, electric or hydraulic power.

You can also find impact wrenches named as impactor, air wrench or rattle gun

Uses:

  • Used for maintenance and repairing heavy equipment
  • Help in automotive repair
  • Construction
  • Assembling and dissembling tools

Pros:

  • multipurpose
  • High power and strong impact on materials
  • Delivers with more torque
  • Comes in a variety of designs
  • Customizable through attachments to the front of the wrench

Cons:

  • Bulky and heavy
  • Very Pricey

Pistol grip hand drills

Pistol grip hand drills get their name from the design of their handle. It is shaped like a pistol, which is a more ergonomic design for more user control in drilling.

They are made of either plastic, steel, or iron. These drills are designed to be resistant to damage, dust and debris. They also have removable compartments to store drill bits when not in use.

Uses:

  • used in woodworking, construction, metalworking and at-home do-it-yourself projects.
  • drill holes into different materials such as wood, metal, concrete and particle board
  • fasten materials together with nuts and bolts.
  • crush parts of your workpiece so that they fall away as in masonry drilling when working with concrete or rock.
  • slice away parts of your workpiece, with a saw attachment.
  • counterboring or countersinking.

Pros:

  • multipurpose
  • Drilling opening ability to 13mm (1/2″) it. (in steel)
  • Ergonomically designed
  • High torque

Cons:

  • Relies on battery power or electricity

Mechanic drill:

A mechanic drill is a power drill that is great for general purpose and heavy-duty tasks.

Uses:

  • Drill through wood and metals.

Pros:

  • can do both light and heavy duty jobs

Cons:

  • Requires a lot of maintenance for it to work and last long

Hex drill:

A hex drill is named for the only drill bit it can use – a hex bit shank. The hex drill is designed with several flats – with the distance between the two flats is 10 mm.

It delivers high torque in drilling but it is also not as strong as other drills

Uses:

  • Drills into soft materials
  • Drives screws and fasteners

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • High torque

Cons:

  • limited strength
  • Only uses hex bit shanks

Right-Angle Drill

The right-angle drill is a great power drill because it can help you work on places a standard drill can’t access. It is ergonomically designed for versatile use.

Professional servicemen such as plumbers, electricians, repairmen, and carpenters use it regularly at their work.

You can find right-angle drills in both corded and cordless models.

Uses:

  • Drilling holes in tight places where a standard drill can work on
  • For installing pipes, threading wires, and more

Pros:

  • great for tight spaces
  • Versatile
  • Ergonomic design
  • Variable torque

Drill Driver

A drill driver is a versatile power tool. It can drill into a wide variety of materials and drive in screws with fine torque control. It works with consistent rotational motion.

Its keyless chuck can hold a variety of drill bits, driver bits, and other rotary bits. This makes it one of the most recommended power tools for all general purpose tasks in DIY, woodworking and furniture making.

Uses:

  • Drills holes in plastic, wood, and metal.
  • drilling, driving screws, polishing using rotary sanders and wheel brushes.
  • Drives fasteners in a wide variety of materials from wood to concrete
  • DIY, Woodworking, furniture making, Home improvement

Pros:

  • high RPM
  • Excellent control with clutch
  • Keyless chuck
  • Versatile
  • Drills fast
  • Works with less noise
  • affordable

Cons:

  • Delivers less torque

SwitchDriver

The SwitchDriver is a new innovation in the drilling tool market. It is a two-headed tool that efficiently combines a cordless drill with an impact driver. It is designed with a drill bit in one head and a screwdriver on the other, located on a rotating chuck.

With just a flip of a button, you can switch back and forth between drilling or driving tasks effortlessly.

Uses:

  • DIY and home improvement tasks such as installing wood fence lines, adding decks, and drilling into steel and lumber

Pros:

  • multipurpose
  • Cordless
  • fast switch from drilling to driving
  • dual speed
  • strong battery life
  • Trigger-activated light
  • Fine torque control

Cons:

  • only takes ¼” HEX bits

Core Drill

A core drill is a drill that has been used since ancient times, to be exact, starting in Egypt by 3000 BC. This extremely powerful tool creates holes and clears materials with more power than a hole saw. It is named for the material left inside the drill bit – core.

A core drill is usually made with carbide or industrial diamond grit. This is strong and durable enough to drill through wood, metal, concrete and hard rock. It is designed with a safety clutch and secondary grip for worker safety.

They are used in many fields, especially in mining and heavy construction.

You can find them in either electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic designs.

Uses:

  • putting large hole into walls or surfaces
  • rapid drilling applications
  • drilling masonry
  • cutting through rebar
  • creating holes for pipes, manholes, and other large-diameter penetrations in concrete or stone.
  • prominently used in mineral explorations

Pros:

  • Extremely powerful
  • Heavy-duty driller
  • Made strong and durable

Cons:

  • Generates a lot of dust during drilling
  • expensive

D-Handle Drill

The D-Handle drill is named for its uniquely shaped handle. This is a heavy-duty power tool that offers stable, powerful drilling action and high torque.

This versatile tool can quickly drill holes in a wide variety of materials from wood to concrete. It works with three modes: rotation, hammer and rotation with hammering action.

This drill is favored by many tradesmen such as masons, renovators, electricians, maintenance crews and general contractors.

Uses:

  • Drilling holes through both soft and hard materials
  • DIY, woodworking, plumbing and repair work

Pros:

  • Powerful
  • Heavy-duty tool
  • Ergonomic design
  • Versatile Tool

Pneumatic/air drills:

Pneumatic or air drills run, powered by the power of compressed air. These are powerful and consistent drillers. These air-powered tools are ergonomically designed for all workers of all trades from woodworkers to dentists.

These are very strong tools that can consistently deliver high torque. This makes it great for those who make in automotive and repair shops where workers remove things such as rusty bolts or lug nuts on tires.

Uses:

  • Drills into soft and dense materials such as wood, metals, brick and stone

Pros:

  • Affordable
  • Durable
  • Very strong
  • High torque

Cons:

  • Works noisily
  • High maintenance
  • Requires a hose to work

Straight air drill

The straight air drill is a type of pneumatic drill with an inline design. This small, handheld drill is perfect for repair work and varied drilling applications. With this, you can drill into wet and dry materials.

This makes it perfect for every tradesmen from DIYers to construction professionals.

Uses:

Drills into surfaces on confined or tight spaces

Pros:

  • Lightweight and portable
  • Can be used in wet or damp areas risk-free
  • Accurate torque control
  • High cutting velocity

Cons:

  • Require periodic inspection and routine maintenance
  • Risk of cumulative trauma disorders from working too long

Screwdriver drill:

A screwdriver drill is a great tool for basic drilling and driving applications. It delivers more torque than regular drills. With a lower rotation per minute, you get more control in your drilling operations.

This tool is also a time-saver at the workplace because you no longer need pre-drilling.

Uses:

  • Drilling into wood and other soft materials
  • Home repairs, DIY, furniture assembly, lighting projects, and woodworking projects such as shelf, towel bar, and cabinetry installation.

Pros:

  • powerful
  • No pre-drilling
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Ergonomic design
  • Affordable
  • You can change between different bits effortlessly

Cons:

  • iffy power switch
  • Requires charging, or continuous electric power supply

Screwdriver

A screwdriver is not a drill but it can work as a drill, if it is a powered model.

It comes with an inline design instead of a pistol grip but lower power than a standard drill driver.

They drill and drive screws and fasteners into materials by spinning the chuck clockwise or counterclockwise.

Uses:

  • Drilling or driving small and/or delicate fasteners on materials that need as much torque
  • Electronics repair
  • Mechanical and industrial production
  • Woodworking/carpentry
  • Drilling in Flammable environments

Pros:

  • multipurpose
  • Lightweight and handy
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Less powerful than most drills

Drywall Screwdriver (Drywall Screwgun)

Drywall screwdrivers are also technically not drills. They are designed to purely drive or fasten screws, nuts and bolts into drywall. This power tool works with specialized bits that release drywall screws before they rupture the drywall’s paper skin.

They are highly favored by builders, renovators and repairmen because they are very easy to use and install drywall quickly. They have higher RPMs than other drills.

Uses:

  • Driving screws into drywall

Pros:

  • Very easy to use
  • Self-tapping
  • Installs drywall quicker and easier
  • Less risk of wrist fatigue or injuries
  • Built to be durable and long-lasting

Cons:

  • Limited only to drywall

Pillar drill:

A pillar drill works similarly to a tabletop drilling machine. But they are larger and boast higher drilling capacities. It is named for its foundation - it stands on the ground.

Drilling with a pillar drill is quicker and more precise than with a hand drill.

It comes with a movable work table. It is designed with tall tubular columns and stands upon a base.

Uses:

  • Light drilling
  • Metalworking

Pros:

  • great for larger holes with Forstner drills or a hole saw.
  • Drill bits do not break while drilling
  • Drill holes with the same depth
  • Quick and precise drilling

Cons:

  • expensive

Drill press:

A drill press is a powerful drilling machine. It comes in various designs and forms. This potent tool is great for precision drilling.

Uses:

  • drilling, reaming, tapping, counterboring, countersinking, and spotfacing.

Pros:

  • very powerful
  • High torque
  • Can precisely control depth repetition
  • Less worker fatigue
  • Longer drill bit life

Cons:

  • Not portable
  • Limited travel of the arbor
  • expensive

Vertical drill:

The vertical drill is an upright drill press. This is inverter-driven, with variable speed up to 2500 RPM. Its body lays on a base. The worker hand feeds the work pieces into drill. Or you can a model with a power feed mechanism that automatically pushes the tool into the workpiece.

This is great for a wide variety of drilling tasks, from light to heavy-duty drilling.

Uses:

  • drills into a wide variety of materials from wood to metal
  • used in fabrication shops and trade schools

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • variable speed
  • heavy-duty

Cons:

  • not portable

Gear head drill press

This drill gets its name from its gear head which sends power from the motor to the spindle through spur gearing inside the machine's head, eliminating a flexible drive belt.

This is a drill made for industrial use, particularly for metalworking.

Uses:

 

tool rooms and commercial industries

metalworking

Pros:

  • variable speed
  • comes with coolant systems
  • self-tapping
  • powerful

Cons:

  • for industrial use only

Horizontal Drill Press

This floor-mounted drill has a forward-facing drill bit. The motor assembly is mounted behind the tool on a heavy spring and a cam handle is used to hold the workpiece down on the table when drilling.

Once turned on, a pedal is used to pull the drill assembly forward into the workpiece. This tool is most commonly found in woodworking shops and can be used to drill accurate holes when preparing wood for furniture or similar projects.

Uses:

putting holes through very dense materials works on softwood and soft metals.

Drills into bones

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • Better at drilling metal and different materials that require a higher cutting velocity

Cons:

  • Generates less torque
  • Not also suited to drilling expansive breadth gaps

Portable drill press

This drill press is lightweight for easy transport to wherever you want to work. It is also designed in such a way that you can temporarily anchor the base.

But a portable drill press still can boast huge power and torque for heavy-duty drilling.

Uses:

Heavy-duty drilling

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • portable
  • ergonomic design
  • heavy-duty

Cons:

  • expensive

Radial arm drill press

The radial arm drill press, otherwise known as a radial arm drill, is a workhorse of most machine shops.

It helps workers drill effortlessly by setting the spindle directly over the workpiece rather than move the workpiece to the tool. It is very versatile and easy to use.

One of the things you can take advantage with this drilling machine is that you can cover a large area of work without changing the position of the drilling machine. It’s a time-saver because it drills fast and accurately on almost any material.

Uses:

  • Drills into a wide range of materials from wood to metals such as steel and cast iron.

Pros:

  • Powerful
  • Variable speed
  • Great for large work pieces
  • Works on a wide variety of materials
  • Built to be durable and rugged
  • Rotating table
  • High precision and accuracy
  • Better at drilling metal and different materials that require a higher cutting velocity

Cons:

  • Bulky and heavy
  • expensive

Gang Drilling Machines

The gang style drilling machine or gang drill press is a type of drill press with several work heads positioned over a single table.

You use this for successive drilling operations – industrial scale.

Uses:

  • Industrial scale drilling

Pros:

  • Powerful
  • Precise even in successive drilling

Cons:

  • Only for industrial scale drilling
  • Expensive too much for a DIYer

Multiple Spindle Drilling Machine

The multiple spindle drilling machine, known as multispindle drill press or multi-station machine, is a specialized drilling tool for industrial use.

This drill is designed with many spindles connected to one main work head. These are fed into the  workpiece at the same time.

Uses:

  • Industrial scale drilling

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • Powerful, with lots of torque
  • Heavy-duty

Cons:

  • Only for industrial use
  • expensive

Turret Type Drilling Machine

Another industrial type of drill press is the Turret drilling machines. It is designed with several drilling heads mounted on a turret. Equipped with different types of cutting accessories, it can tackle many workpieces all at once.

Uses:

  • Industrial scale drilling and fastening

Pros:

  • Powerful
  • Versatile
  • Heavy-duty

Cons:

  • Only for industrial use

Micro-Drill Press

If you want a drill press but are on a budget, you can get a micro drill press. This little high-spindle drill is a perfectly accurate cutter which can be used to drill into small materials.   

Uses:

  • drilling, reaming, tapping, counterboring, countersinking, and spotfacing on small work pieces

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • Can work on many different small materials
  • Handy
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Only good for DIY and small drilling tasks
  • Cannot work on large work pieces

Magnetic drills:

Also called a magnetic drill press, a magnetic drill is a portable drilling machine. It works with either twist drill bits or annular cutters. It drills with metal cores to create holes through any metal.

Uses:

  • Threading, reaming and countersinking
  • Drilling holes through any metal.

Pros:

  • Portable
  • Drills fast
  • Cuts through any metal

Cons:

  • Only works for metal

Paper Drill

This drill is a similar tool to the drill press. But it is made for drilling holes in paper 

A paper drill can drill one or more holes simultaneously in a stack of paper up to two inches thick. 

Uses:

 

  • drilling precise holes in paper

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • can make holes simultaneously

Cons:

  • only works on paper

Bench drill:

This is one of the most common drills. A bench drill can drill fast and accurately, mounted on on the bench or any table.

But they are some limits in terms of the height of the tool.

Uses:

  • Woodworking
  • Basic drilling tasks

Pros:

  • Sleek and compact
  • Drills fast
  • Powerful motor

Cons:

  • Restricted in height

Ratchet drill:

A ratchet drill is designed with a gear and pawl. It drills in a circular motion and can only rotate in one direction.

Uses:

  • Applied in automotive repairs and assembly
  • Drills into small bolts and nuts.

Pros:

  • Drills accurately
  • Works quietly
  • Slim and compact design

Cons:

  • Generates less torque
  • Not very powerful
  • Risk of broken knuckles

Deck drill:

A deck drill is mainly named for the material it is mostly used on - decks. It is made tough with copper or coated steel.

It is designed a tapered body, partially threaded. As a bonus, it is good for any work condition, from sunny to rainy weather.

Uses:

  • drill both hard and soft materials, including softwood decking boards.

Pros:

  • drills fast
  • durable
  • designed for any work condition

    Autofeed drill:

    This drill is very easy to start with a press of a button. It's also time-saving with its power feed cycle.

    It's also very safe to use for any worker, as long as you practice the skills of drilling with this tool.

    Uses:

    • drilling holes simultaneously

    Pros:

    • Portable
    • Easy to mount in any position
    • easy to use
    • Minimal maintenance

      Cons:

      • requires mastery before you see efficiency in the tool

      Mill drill:

      This is a light duty drilling machine, that you can use in lieu of a milling machine. It can drill in two directions - horizontal and vertical direction.

      A mill drill is very popular because it is securely designed, lightweight, compact, versatile and very affordable.

      Uses:

      • light drilling tasks

      Pros:

      • lightweight and compact
      • versatile
      • affordable
      • ergonomic design

      Cons:

      • can't handle massive projects

      Drifter Drill

      A drifter drill is a specially designed drill for miners. It is designed with a percussive system and a rotating system. The percussive system runs at 2000-5000 strikes per minute, whereas the rotating system is at 100-400 per minute.

      This drill is mounted on a feed, attached with flexible boom (like an arm) to a stationary or mobile unit that contains the power supply.

      You can find drifter drills as either top-hammer drills (usually hydraulic) or down-the-hole drills (usually pneumatic).

      Uses:

      • drilling horizontal holes through rock, stone and mining areas
      • used in mining, construction, exploration, and natural science.

      Pros:

      • drills fast
      • highly precise
      • powerful
      • variable speed

      Cons:

      • only for mining, construction and exploration industries

      Churn Drill

      The churn drill is a large drilling machine that drills through the ground. It is usually used to extract minerals such as lead and zinc.

      It is an ancient drill, invented during 221 BC in Qin Dynasty China. This tool has helped run the mining operations across the world - from China to America.

      Uses:

      • drills through rocks and stones
      • mostly used in mining operations

      Pros:

      • drills accurately
      • handy
      • easy to use

      Cons:

      • only for mining industry

      Beam Drill

      A beam drill is named for the material it can drill into - beams. The drill is vertically aligned and the base rests directly upon the wood.

      Once the bit is lowered and aligned, you straddle the beam and use the two bicycle pedal-style hand cranks on either side to corkscrew the bit into the wood, then simply reverse the process to remove the bit from the hole.

      Uses:

      • large-scale construction

      Pros:

      • drills fast
      • powerful and lots of torque
      • easy to use

      Cons:

      • quite limited in use

      CNC Drill

      CNC (Computer Numerical Control) drill is a specially designed drill for mass production industries. It is a powerful, versatile tool that is also highly advanced. 

      CNC drills are designed as fully enclosed units with retractable access and an external computer terminal.

      Uses:

      • drills precise holes quickly.
      • also capable of drilling, boring, milling, and turning.

      Pros:

      • drills fast
      • versatile
      • powerful

      Cons:

      • Only for mass industry

      Dental drill

      A dental drill is a specially designed drill with tungsten-carbide blades. This is made solely to perform dental procedures. It is designed with internal mechanical components which initiate a rotational force and provide power to the cutting instrument, usually a dental burr.

      Uses:

      • Drills into bones
      • used for dental procedures such as cleaning, removing decay, polishing fillings, performing cosmetic dentistry, and altering prostheses.

      Pros:

      • drills fast
      • highly precise and powerful

      Cons:

      • needs regular disinfection and sterilization with special solutions
      • Specialized only for dentists

      Cranial drill

      Cranial drills are specialized tools for medical professionals, specifically a doctor. This is the surgeon's drill. It can cut accurate holes in incredibly dense bone. 

      Uses:

      • used for neurosurgery operations
      • Drills into bones

      Pros:

      • drills accurately
      • handy
      • easy to use

      Cons:

      • specialized for doctors only

      Conclusion

      Drills are one of the most essential tools for tradesmen. With this, you can work on many materials from wood to bones. But to get the best results in your drilling tasks, you need to get the right drill.

      Depending on the nature of your work, you will most likely stock your toolkit with one or more drills in this list for drilling and driving applications around the home and in specialized industries. 

      We hope this guide has helped you get started on drilling.

      To learn about drills and other tools of the trade for DIYers and professionals alike, go to Rockhard Tools. We offer you everything from product reviews to how-to guides.  Rockhard Tools provides top quality masonry drill bits, jobber twist drill bits, anchors and fastening systems, hacksaw blades, jig saw blades and more.

                  Jenny Mae Talaver
                  Jenny Mae Talaver



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